Recent Blog Posts

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

We are hiring an Archives Research Assistant to work on MAPP at Special Collections, University of Reading. This is a 0.4 post, fixed term for two years. Job spec and details on how to apply are available here: https://jobs.reading.ac.uk/displayjob.aspx?jobid=4853

Written collectively by the students of ILS 695: Introducing Digital Humanities

Taught by Matthew Hannah, Spring 2019, Purdue University

 

E. P. Taylor, Amanda Leary, Alejandra Ortega, Bo Blew, Daniel Carrillo Jara, Margaret Sheble, Sunyoung Kim, and Shiyu Zhang

 

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

Women in Publishing, a one-day symposium at the University of Reading, Friday 14th June 2019 

“All publishing was run by many badly-paid women and a few much better-paid men” 

(Diana Athill, Stet: An Editor’s Life, 2002) 

 

Feminist book history and print culture is thriving. Recent books and projects exploring feminist publishers, modernist presses, and women’s work in periodicals and magazines has revealed the variety of ways in which women contributed to the circulation and production of nineteenth and twentieth-century print cultures. Academic interest in the value of networks and collaboration and the often overlooked aspect of women’s creative labour (#thanksfortyping) is at the forefront of some of this renewed interest in women’s diverse, deeply embedded work in publishing and the circulation of global print cultures. 

 

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

Tomorrow, February 19, MAPP co-founder Alice Staveley and MAPP Project Manager, Anna Mukamal, are excited to be joining Matthew Hannah's graduate DH course at Purdue University to talk about DH project design, challenges and opportunies in DH work, and what it's like for a graduate student to become involved in DH initiatives as part of her doctoral education.  All part of MAPP's continuing outreach to innovative pedagogical experiments in the discipline across the nation.  

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

What's on your Hogarth shelves?  Do you have stories associated with your collecting, reading, or acquiring of Hogarth Press books you would like to share?  If so, please consider submitting to the forthcoming "Collecting Woolf" issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, edited by Catherine Hollis.  Deadline: 31 October 2018

CFP: Collecting Virginia Woolf

Who collects Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books? When did the demand for and economic value of Woolf’s and the Hogarth Press’s books begin in the antiquarian book trade? Are Woolf and Hogarth Press books more or less desirable than other modernist first editions? What are the emotional, haptic, and educational values of early Woolf and Hogarth Press editions for scholars, students, and common readers? What do the book collections of Virginia and Leonard Woolf tell us about their lives as readers and writers? 

 

Anna Mukamal's picture
Authored by Anna Mukamal

On April 5, 2018, Drs. Claire Battershill and Helen Southworth used Zoom (a video conferencing software) to join the Literature & Digital Humanities (DH) English department graduate seminar taught by Dr. J. Ashley Foster at California State University, Fresno, and share the creation and production of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP). The following is a collaboratively-written account of their contribution to the class.

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

And in more MAPP related publications, we're happy to announce the publication of Virginia Woolf and the World of Books, edited by Nicola Wilson and Claire Battershill.  A curated selection of papers inspired by last year's Virginia Woolf Conference at the University of Reading, this volume showcases new scholarship on the interventions of book history and material culture into Woolf studies.  Topics include archives, craftmanship, artwork, libraries, collecting, reading, publishing, translation, reception, re-visions, editing and teaching. There is also a chapter on MAPP written by our King's University undergrad team: Sara Grimm, Rynnelle Wiebe and Tyler Johansson. 

Anna Mukamal's picture
Authored by Anna Mukamal

MAPP co-founders and team members Claire Battershill and Helen Southworth have both recently published well-received books focusing on the concept of biography as it relates to Leonard and Virginia Woolf’s Hogarth Press. Here is a brief introduction to both works, which epitomize the kind of rigorous historical research made possible through deep engagement with archival materials such as the ones MAPP curates on its continually-expanding site.

Authored by Chloe Rendall

Surprisingly, I think I have only recently understood the full power of the bookshop. As a literature graduate and book lover it is perhaps no shock that bookshops are among my favourite places to spend time (and usually a small fortune!). I have loved many a bookshop, often in a quiet, personal way. Perhaps now more than ever, in a fast-paced and frequently impersonal society of online shopping, the almost sacred quality that bookshops can possess is particularly striking. What they offer, for me at least, is a haven of knowledge and creativity, going beyond that of a retail exploit. There is increasing academic interest in the role of the modernist bookshop at present, as shown by Huw Osborne's recent edited collection and Andrew Thacker's article in Modernist Cultures (11.3, 2016).

Matthew Hannah's picture
Authored by Matthew Hannah

Beginning in that annus mirabilis of modern literature, 1922, and petering out in 1950, the letters between novelist E. M. Forster and the Hogarth Press provide a fascinating and extended glimpse of the relationship between one of England’s best novelists and his publishing agents. This trove of letters features discussions about the technical particulars of paper color and type, of distribution and copyright, but they also hint at personal details of the correspondents, most notably between Leonard Woolf and Forster, or “Morgan” as he’s addressed. Although most of the letters sent during this 28-year period focus on publishing and distribution, small details about the relationship between the two men peek through the negotiations and discussions about Forster’s book Pharos and Pharillon, published by Hogarth Press in May 1923. Both aspects of this collection are fascinating for scholars and students of modern publishing and literature.

Pages