Welcome to The Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP): a critical digital archive of early twentieth-century publishers, beginning with Leonard and Virginia Woolf's Hogarth Press.  

Recent Blog Posts

Posted by Peter Morgan on 11/15/2017 - 20:32

 

The hand must have trembled. The regular dip of the capital J turned slightly, yet noticeably, to the left as if by some interruption. I had no idea what might have startled the writer, but my mind took to creatively filling the gaps. A mother of three, she must have been deprived of sleep by a particularly late night reading to the kids about the professional horse races she had loved as a child; startled by the sudden entrance of the Welsh bagman, her pen had slipped creating, for my post-millennial eyes, that lopsided enigmatic “J”.

Posted by Nicola Wilson on 10/03/2017 - 09:31

Author Biographies and Publisher Descriptions 

We are seeking submissions for biographical entries for the authors, artists and workers of The Hogarth Press, and for MAPP's publishing house descriptions pages.  MAPP is the first modernist DH project to focus exclusively on twentieth-century publishing houses.  It offers a pioneering digital platform to organize, interact with, and analyze book production, reception, and distribution networks and will represent a replicable digital model for contemporary and future scholars of modernist publishing and book culture. 

We are also open to student work and to pedagogical uses of MAPP. Please contact our team to discuss possible pedagogical collaborations and student writing: http://www.modernistarchives.com/contact

Submission Guidelines

Posted by Victoria Ding on 08/25/2017 - 16:42

The task of transcribing order books from the Hogarth Press sounded straightforward enough to me. I typed out the first few rows of Vita Sackville-West’s All Passion Spent from left to right: date, cumulative total copies sold, markings (such as check marks), purchaser name, code / notes (such as LL), number of copies ordered, date order received, date order filled, and price (in pounds, shillings, and pence). I took time with these first few entries, making sure I captured every detail. As I continued, I became more curious about the materials I was working with. Who was Deighton Bell and why did he buy so many copies, just to return one of them? Why were Menzies and Hockliffe charged different amounts for the same number of copies? In my head, these mysterious buyers started to come to life. Transcription became less of a manual chore; it became a quest to uncover the framework of the Hogarth Press.

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