Welcome to The Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP), a critical digital archive of early twentieth-century publishers, beginning with Leonard and Virginia Woolf's Hogarth Press (est. 1917). We currently have over 4000 artifacts on the site, including one-of-a-kind dust jackets, author and publisher correspondences, readers’ reports, printing and production papers, illustrations, and born digital biographies of people and presses.  We are actively adding more content, and soliciting new materials, as MAPP grows. For a detailed description of our team origins, intellectual history and critical methodology, digital infrastructure, and aspirations for the site, please check out our collaborative book, Scholarly Adventures in Digital Humanities: The Making of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (Palgrave 2017).

Recent Blog Posts

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

And in more MAPP related publications, we're happy to announce the publication of Virginia Woolf and the World of Books, edited by Nicola Wilson and Claire Battershill.  A curated selection of papers inspired by last year's Virginia Woolf Conference at the University of Reading, this volume showcases vibrant new scholarship on the interventions of book history and material culture into Woolf studies.  Topics include archives, craftmanship, artwork, libraries, collecting, reading, publishing, translation, reception, re-visions, editing and teaching.

Anna Mukamal's picture
Authored by Anna Mukamal

MAPP co-founders and team members Claire Battershill and Helen Southworth have both recently published well-received books focusing on the concept of biography as it relates to Leonard and Virginia Woolf’s Hogarth Press. Here is a brief introduction to both works, which epitomize the kind of rigorous historical research made possible through deep engagement with archival materials such as the ones MAPP curates on its continually-expanding site.

Authored by Chloe Rendall

Surprisingly, I think I have only recently understood the full power of the bookshop. As a literature graduate and book lover it is perhaps no shock that bookshops are among my favourite places to spend time (and usually a small fortune!). I have loved many a bookshop, often in a quiet, personal way. Perhaps now more than ever, in a fast-paced and frequently impersonal society of online shopping, the almost sacred quality that bookshops can possess is particularly striking. What they offer, for me at least, is a haven of knowledge and creativity, going beyond that of a retail exploit. There is increasing academic interest in the role of the modernist bookshop at present, as shown by Huw Osborne's recent edited collection and Andrew Thacker's article in Modernist Cultures (11.3, 2016).

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